Thursday, April 7, 2011

Fashion Trends with Staying Powers - Part 1

Hello ladies..
Wanna know which trend with staying powers? Check it out.

Leather Bomber Jacket 
Why it keeps coming back: Strictly for the cockpit set when it debuted during World War II, the bomber jacket, which saw plenty of action on terra firma after it caught on with 80s-era trendsetters, like Madonna, is "chic and a little tough at the same time," explains Valerie Steele, director and chief curator of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, in New York City.
Keep it if: The cut flatters you and the style sticks as close to the original as possible, as any major variations tend to look passé. Take stock of the cuffs, too: "Leather cuffs are more classic than the ones with the knit ribbing," says Kathryn Finney, author of How to Be a Budget Fashionista.
Toss it if: It's exaggerated in any way. "No tight sleeves, loose bodies, or belts," cautions Robert Verdi, a fashion stylist based in New York City. "And if it's red with an embroidered eight ball on the back, ditch it."

Baby-doll Dress
Why it keeps coming back: Ubiquitous in the 60s, the 80s, and even just recently, the Empire-waisted wonder “always returns because it’s very forgiving,” says Rebecca Taylor, a fashion designer in New York City. “People from thin to not-so-thin can wear these dresses, so no one wants to part with them,” says Nicole Miller, a fashion designer in New York City.
Keep it if: It is made from a long-wearing fabric, like silk or wool, and has a trapeze or A-line shape―“but no more voluminous than that,” says Finney. The most recent iteration was positively billowing, bordering on maternity gear, and it probably won’t be trendy again. Instead, store the subtler shapes that gradually flare away from the body.
Toss it if: The color (like an over-the-top hot pink), embellishments (ruffles and rosettes), or length (Shirley Temple–short) make it too youthful looking. “The age limit on looking good in this style is lower than you’d think,” says Steele. “If you’re not sure it’s right for you, then it probably isn’t.”

Platform Shoes and Boots
Why they keep coming back: Platforms have made a footprint on almost every decade of the last century―arguably no more so than in the 70s, when they graced the feet of Stevie Nicks wannabes and hustled the night away under disco balls. “For a heel, they’re easy to walk in, and they have a slightly funky edge,” says Finney. Adds Trina Turk, a fashion designer in Los Angeles, “Hey, it’s a powerful feeling to be taller!”
Keep them if: The shoe is sophisticated (you don’t want to look like a mall-prowling teen) and at least somewhat practical. “A four-inch heel and a one-inch front platform is the max,” says Nicole Miller. Any higher will look a little RuPaul―and be tough to walk in.
Toss them if: “Anything about them is too extreme―like design, material, or thickness of heel,” says Carson Kressley, the host of Lifetime’s How to Look Good Naked. In that case, what goes around definitely won’t be coming around again.

More in Part Two.

xoxo,
Ana

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